Trucking Industry Gets Some Predictability With Bill Passage

Kevin Anderson Hours of Service, Regulations, Transportation

Washington D.C. seems to contain a political environment where little if anything gets done anymore. As a refreshing change from this culture, the trucking industry should benefit from the recent passage of a six-year highway bill. The final vote in the house on the bill was 363 to 64 in favor.

While there were some positive aspects to the bill, the trucking industry did not get everything that they wanted. The amendment process lasted for two days and the house voted out several initiatives sought after by the trucking industry. The bill fell short of the spending that the White House originally asked for in their budget. Now the bill goes to the U.S. Senate for approval before it heads to the White House for a signature of approval or veto.

Positive Changes for Trucking Industry

Among the changes being heralded by the industry are the improvements that roads will see because of increased spending. This should increase safety and efficiency in the areas where money is spent. In total the bill calls for $325 billion in spending over a six-year period.

Additionally, an amendment was passed that deals with state wage and labor laws. As this blog has discussed in the past, there has been a rash of litigation going after trucking companies for violating state labor laws related to wages, breaks, and other provisions. The position of companies in this fights has been that the Federal Aviation Administration Authorization Act preempts states from regulating truck drivers and trucking company’s wages.

Instead of continuing the fight over this dispute with state, the industry pushed for Congress to clarify the issue. The amendment will keep states from applying state labor laws to truckers or their companies when they are subject to the Federal Department of Transportation hours of service rules. This was particularly welcome news to trucking companies doing business in California and other states within the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals’ jurisdiction.

Failed Initiatives

The bill passage was not a complete victory for trucking companies. One amendment that sought to increase the possible load weights of trucks traveling on interstate highways was defeated. So while some states allow for 90,000 pound loads with a sixth axle, that will not be the case for the entire country. Critics of the non-passage argue that failing to include this in the bill will hurt American competitiveness.

Other measure that failed to reach a majority vote included doing away with FMCSA’s CSA scores. That system puts gives trucking companies of a certain size a grade that potential customers can look up and decide whether they want to use the company for business.  An amendment to do away with a future graduated CDL program was also voted down.

Trucking Law Firm for the Future

At Anderson and Yamada, P.C. we track and follow all the important developments in the trucking industry. You can rest assured that we can give the counsel and advice that your company deserves when it comes to the laws, regulations, and rules that impact the trucking industry. Contact us about your trucking law needs.